Spiritual Agnosticism

agnostic by andy singer

A spiritual agnostic is a subset of traditional agnosticism (the philosophical view that it is unknown -or even, unknowable- whether any deities exist or not) that is distinguished by the acceptance of the value of universal ethics yet rejection of any aspects of religions that seem divisive.

For example, love is the ideal source of motivation, and since many (if not all) religions emphasize love, a spiritual agnostic might participate in the practices of one particular religion while simultaneously rejecting some of the mainstream principles of that religion. Regardless of this possibility, spiritual agnosticism claims that innate morality and common ethics are far more important than differences in beliefs.

A spiritual agnostic would say ‘It doesn’t matter what religion you call yourself a follower of, nor does it matter whether or not you believe in God. What matters is what you do, not what you believe.’ A spiritual agnostic might pursue traditionally religious spiritual practices such as prayer, meditation, and contemplation.

Spiritual agnostics are different than theist agnostics in that they do not necessarily lean towards a belief in God, but may have faith or hope that God exists. In either case, the spiritual agnostic sees the question as largely academic. The spiritual agnostic is unconcerned with the question of whether when they pray they are communicating with God or accessing a Jungian archetype. A spiritual agnostic can also be defined by being specifically irreligious, though not necessarily with hostility towards religion. The spiritual agnostic may also be compared to someone who identifies as ‘Spiritual But Not Religious,’ but is more specific about their position on the existence or non-existence of God (or some deity).

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