Archive for April 13th, 2011

April 13, 2011

Mod

roundel

vespa

Mod (from modernist) is a subculture that originated in London in the late 1950s and peaked in the early-to-mid 1960s. Significant elements include: fashion (often tailor-made suits), pop music (including African American soul, Jamaican ska, and British beat music and R&B), and Italian motor scooters.

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April 13, 2011

Zentsūji Watermelon

Zentsūji is a town in Japan notable for producing square watermelons by growing the fruits in glass boxes and letting them naturally assume the shape of the receptacle.

The square shape is designed to make the melons easier to stack and store, but the square watermelons are often more than double the price of normal ones. Pyramid shaped watermelons have also been developed.

April 13, 2011

Designer Toys

tim Biskup qee egg

emilio garcia

Designer toys are collectibles that are produced in limited editions (as few as 10 or as many as 2000 pieces) and created by artists and designers. Designer toys are made of variety of materials; ABS plastic and vinyl are most common, although wood, metal, and resin are occasionally used. The term also encompasses plush, cloth and latex dolls.

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April 13, 2011

27 Club

27 club by Dan Kuhlken

The 27 Club is a group of influential rock and blues musicians who all died at the age of 27, including Blues musician Robert Johnson, Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison, Kurt Cobain, and Amy Winehouse. Most members of the ‘club’ died as a result of drug and alcohol abuse, or other violent means such as homicide or suicide.

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April 13, 2011

Club 57

Ann Magnuson by robert carrithers

Club 57 was a nightclub located at 57 St. Mark’s Place in the East Village, New York City during the late 1970s and early 1980s. It was a hangout and venue for performance- and visual-artists and musicians, including Keith Haring, Klaus Nomi, and to a lesser extent, Jean-Michel Basquiat.

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April 13, 2011

Lester Bangs

lester bangs

Leslie Conway ‘Lester’ Bangs (1948 – 1982) was an American music journalist and  musician. He wrote for ‘Creem’ and ‘Rolling Stone’ magazines and has been called one of the ‘most influential’ voices in rock criticism. In 1969, Bangs began writing freelance after reading an ad in ‘Rolling Stone’ soliciting readers’ reviews.

His first piece was a negative review of the MC5 album ‘Kick Out The Jams,’ which he sent to ‘Rolling Stone’ with a note detailing that should the magazine decide not to publish the review, then they would have to contact Lester and tell him why. They published it.

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April 13, 2011

Creem

boy howdy

Creem was a monthly rock ‘n’ roll publication first published in March 1969 by Barry Kramer and founding editor Tony Reay. It suspended production in 1989 but received a short-lived renaissance in the early 1990s as a glossy tabloid.

Lester Bangs, often cited as ‘America’s Greatest Rock Critic,’ became editor in 1971. The term ‘punk rock’ was said to have been coined by the magazine in 1971, and the term ‘heavy metal’ was also first used in its pages.

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April 13, 2011

Florian Bertmer

greedo

Florian Bertmer is a German illustrator from the hardcore punk, grindcore and metal scene. His early works are reminiscent of fellow punk artist, Pushead, while later works have become more Art Nouveau influenced. He fronted the band Cheerleaders Of The Apocalypse.

April 13, 2011

Pushead

Pushead (Brian Schroeder) is an artist and record label owner within the hardcore punk and heavy metal field. He has created artwork for Metallica, Travis Barker, and The Misfits. His artwork is characterized by detailed skulls.

He designed skateboard graphics and advertisements for Zorlac Skateboards during the 80s and beginning of the 90s. He fronted the band Septic Death during the 1980s.

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April 13, 2011

Sala Keoku

mucalinda

Sala Keoku is a park featuring giant fantastic concrete sculptures inspired by Buddhism and Hinduism. It is located in Thailand, near the Thai-Lao border and the Mekong river. The park has been built by and reflects the personal vision of Thai spiritual leader and sculptor, Luang Pu Bunleua Sulilat and his followers (the construction started in 1978). It shares the style of Sulilat’s earlier creation, Buddha Park on the Lao side of Mekong, but is marked by even more extravagant fantasy and greater proportions.

Some of the Sala Keoku sculptures tower up to 25m in the sky. Those include a monumental depiction of Buddha meditating under the protection of a seven-headed Naga snake (Mucalinda). While the subject (based on a Buddhist legend) is one of the recurrent themes in the religious art of the region, Sulilat’s approach is highly unusual, with its naturalistic (even though stylized) representation of the snakes.

April 13, 2011

Dichroic Glass

dichro

Dichroic [dahy-kroh-ikglass is glass containing multiple micro-layers of metal oxides which alter its optical properties. The invention of dichroic glass is often erroneously attributed to NASA and its contractors, who developed it for use in dichroic filters.

Dichroic glass dates back to at least the 4th century CE as seen in the Lycurgus cup, a Roman relic.

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