Millwall Brick

millwall

A Millwall brick is an improvised weapon made of a manipulated newspaper. It was named for supporters of Millwall F.C., who had a stereotyped reputation for football hooliganism.

The Millwall brick was allegedly used as a stealth weapon at football matches in England during the 1960s and 1970s.

In the late 1960s — in response to football hooliganism at matches in England — police began confiscating any objects that could be used as weapons, such as steel combs, pens, beermats, mints, shoelaces and boots. However, fans were still permitted to bring in newspapers. Larger newspapers such as ‘The Guardian’ or ‘The Financial Times’ work best for a Millwall brick, and the police looked with suspicion at working class football fans who carried such newspapers. Because of their more innocent appearance, tabloid newspapers became the newspapers of choice for Millwall bricks.

The newspaper sheets can first be soaked with a liquid to add weight. The blunt end can be wrapped with a shoelace or leather. The ends can be taped together and a string attached to the handle, enabling the user to swing the brick, similar to a meteor hammer. A pencil, pen, or large nail can be driven from the first interior side near the middle perpendicularly through the first end so that that head of the nail rests against the first interior side. The nail may be secured in place by bringing the ends towards and adjacent to each other, effectively forming a crude nail bat.

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