Archive for April 13th, 2012

April 13, 2012

All Cops Are Bastards

acab

A.C.A.B. stands for ‘All Cop[per]s Are Bastards.’ Dating from at least the 1940s, and used as a slogan during the UK miners’ strike, A.C.A.B. is an abbreviation often integrated into prison tattoos in the United Kingdom, it is most commonly rendered with one letter between the knuckle and first joint of each finger, alternatively sometimes seen as symbolic small dots across each knuckle.

The British Oi! punk band, the 4-Skins, popularized the acronym in their 1980s song of the same name. It is currently in common usage as a phrase and tattoo amongst some ultras ( a type of sports fans renowned for their fanatical and elaborate displays of ‘support’) groups in Europe, particularly in Eastern Europe where most groups are more akin to hooligans than ultras.

April 13, 2012

HWDP

hwdp

HWDP [ha-voo-de-pe] is a frequently used acronym of a Polish vulgar phrase ‘chuj w dupę policji,’ meaning literally ‘a dick up the police’s ass.’ It can be best compared to the English-language phrase ACAB (‘All Cops Are Bastards’), known in western English-language countries, painted on walls by aggressive football fans already in the 1960s. It is also commonly used as a tattoo among some of the Latino prisoners in the United States of America, who claim it stands for ‘Always Carry A Bible,’ when asked about it by the authorities. Another English counterpart of this Polish vulgar phrase is FTP, an acronym of the phrase ‘fuck the police.’

This vulgar slogan, often written on walls, is used by a part of the youth as a form of provocation against the police, but also one of its ‘trademarks.’ Writing of the HWDP characters, visible from far, is a de facto form of aggressive vandalism, which reasonably lowers the value of the flats near the marked objects. The habit of using the HWDP slogan is particularly popular amongst aggressive football fans, called pseudokibice, of the beginning of the 21st century. It is a specific expression of protest against the authorities and the entire surrounding system, although it isn’t an ideological rebellion, but instead, a characteristic sign of the additude to the surrounding reality.

April 13, 2012

Sager

sager

Sager Midern Computer, Inc., is an American OEM (original equipment manufacturer) computer manufacturer specializing in laptop computers. Sager laptops are manufactured by Clevo which are also sold under many other brand names. Sager is the biggest Clevo retailer. In addition to selling physical hardware, Sager also offers support and repair services for all Clevo based Laptops. This service is offered even if the laptop was not ordered through Sager, although in that case the user must pay in full for all services provided.

The company was founded in 1985 by Shung Song Yuan in City of Industry, California. While ‘A-brands’ such as Dell, Toshiba, IBM, or HP are manufactured on a contract basis where so-called contract manufacturers assemble laptop computers as specified by the brand, Sager instead purchases finished and generic chassis designed and built by Original Design Manufacturers or ODMs (such as Clevo). Sager then assembles the laptop with parts chosen by the final customer, puts its logo on the chassis and sells them under the brand Sager. Sager then provides support to these computers.

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April 13, 2012

Clevo

clevo

Clevo is a Taiwanese OEM/ODM (original equipment and design manufacturer) computer manufacturer which exclusively produces laptop computers. They manufacture and sell complete laptops under their own brand; they also sell laptop chassis to other OEMs who build laptops on the chassis, often customized for each customer.

Companies which rebrand Clevo chassis or have in the past include Sager, iBuypower, and OriginPC. Alienware also used to sell rebranded Clevo notebooks, although it is unclear whether they still do.

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April 13, 2012

Miso

Miso [mee-soh] is a traditional Japanese seasoning produced by fermenting rice, barley and/or soybeans, with salt and the fungus kōjikin, the most typical miso being made with soy. The result is a thick paste used for sauces and spreads, pickling vegetables or meats, and mixing with dashi soup stock to serve as miso soup called ‘misoshiru,’ a Japanese culinary staple. High in protein and rich in vitamins and minerals, miso played an important nutritional role in feudal Japan.

Miso is still very widely used in Japan, both in traditional and modern cooking, and has been gaining world-wide interest. Miso is typically salty, but its flavor and aroma depend on various factors in the ingredients and fermentation process. There is a very wide variety of miso available. Different varieties of miso have been described as salty, sweet, earthy, fruity, and savory. The traditional Chinese analogue of miso is known as dòujiàng.

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April 13, 2012

Mole

mole

Mole [moh-ley] (from the Aztec word for ‘sauce’) is the generic name for a number of sauces used in Mexican cuisine, as well as for dishes based on these sauces. Outside of Mexico, it often refers to a specific sauce which is known in Spanish by the more specific name ‘mole poblano.’ In contemporary Mexico, the term is used for a number of sauces, some quite dissimilar to one another, including black, red, yellow, colorado, green, almendrado, and pipián. The sauce is most popular in the central and southern regions of the country, but eaten nationwide, particularly during celebrations.

In Mexico, to say ‘to go to a mole’ (‘ir a un mole’) means to go to a wedding. Three states in Mexico claim to be the origin of mole, Puebla, Oaxaca, and Tlaxcala. The states with the best known moles are Puebla and Oaxaca, but other regions in Mexico also make various types of mole sauces. Moles come in various flavors and ingredients, with chili peppers as the common factor. A classic mole poblano is a dark red or brown sauce served over meat. Mole has a strong flavor, especially the dark ones, and is considered to be an acquired taste for most. This has spawned another saying, ‘en su mero mole,’ which means something like ‘one’s cup of tea.’

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April 13, 2012

Oxford Comma

oxford comma

The serial comma (also known as the Oxford comma or Harvard comma) is the comma used immediately before a coordinating conjunction (usually ‘and’ or ‘or’) preceding the final item in a list of three or more items.

For example, a list of three countries can be punctuated as either ‘Portugal, Spain, and France’ (with the serial comma) or as ‘Portugal, Spain and France’ (without the serial comma).

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