Jump Rope

Double Dutch

Jump rope is a tool used in the sport of skipping/jump rope where one or more participants jump over a rope swung so that it passes under their feet and over their heads. There are multiple subsets of skipping/jump rope including: single freestyle, single speed, pairs, three person speed (Double Dutch), and three person freestyle (Double Dutch freestyle).

In freestyle events, jumpers use a variety of basic and advanced techniques in a routine of one minute, which is judged by a head judge, content judges, and performance judges. In speed events, a jumper alternates their feet with the rope going around the jumper every time one of their feet hit the ground for 30 seconds, one minute, or three minutes. The jumper is judged on the number of times the right foot touches the ground in those times.

Skipping may be used as a cardiovascular workout, similar to jogging or bicycle riding, and has a high intensity level. This aerobic exercise can achieve a ‘burn rate’ of up to 700 to over 1200 calories per hour of vigorous activity. Ten minutes of skipping is roughly the equivalent of running an eight-minute mile. Skipping for 15–20 minutes is enough to burn off the calories from a candy bar and is equivalent to 45–60 minutes of running depending upon the intensity of jumps and leg swings.

There were two main world organizations: International Rope Skipping Federation (FISAC-IRSF), and the World Jump Rope Federation (WJRF). They merged into the International Jump Rope Union (IJRU), and, in 2019, reorganized as the International Rope Skipping Organisation (IRSO).

Speed jump ropes are made from a thin vinyl cord. They are best for indoor use, because they will wear down fast on concrete or other harsh surfaces. The beaded ropes make rhythmic jumping very easy, because the jumper can hear the beads hitting the ground and strive for a rhythmic pattern. The leather jump rope tangles less than the speed rope.

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