Archive for February 20th, 2012

February 20, 2012

Baby Bottleneck

baby bottleneck

Baby Bottleneck is a 1945 Warner Brothers Looney Tunes theatrical cartoon short released in 1946 and directed by Bob Clampett and written by Warren Foster. In the short, there is a baby boom in the postwar US; an overworked stork (a clear Jimmy Durante reference) gets drunk in the ‘Stork Klub.’ A mix up results in babies getting sent to the wrong parents (such as a baby Hippopotamus to a Scottish Terrier). To clear up the confusion, Porky Pig is brought in to manage the factory, with Daffy Duck as his assistant. The babies are seen going through a conveyor belt (to the tune of Raymond Scott’s famous ‘Powerhouse’) and getting sent by various animals, while Daffy mans the phones, making quick references to Bing Crosby, Eddie Cantor, and the Dionne Quintuplets.

When a stray egg is found without an address, Porky decides to have Daffy sit on it until it hatches. However, Daffy refuses to sit around on top of an egg. Porky chases Daffy around the factory (complete with an imitation of Porky by Daffy), until they wind up trapped on the conveyor belt. The belt stuffs both of them into one package (with Porky as the legs and Daffy as the top half) and sends them off to Africa, where a gorilla is waiting. When the gorilla looks at the ‘baby,’ Porky peeks through the diaper, causing the gorilla to cry on the telephone, ‘Mr. Anthony, I have a problem!!’ (a reference to John J. Anthony, who conducted a daily radio advice program at the time called ‘The Goodwill Hour’; its stock phrase was ‘I have a problem, Mr. Anthony’).

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February 20, 2012

Ren & Stimpy

ren and stimpy

log

The Ren & Stimpy Show, often simply referred to as Ren & Stimpy, is an American animated television series, created by Canadian animator John Kricfalusi for Nickelodeon. The series focuses on the titular characters: Ren Höek, a psychotic chihuahua, and Stimpson J. Cat, a good-natured, dimwitted cat. The show premiered in 1991, on the same day as the debut of ‘Rugrats’ and ‘Doug,’ the three of which comprised the original Nicktoons. The show ran for five seasons on the network.

Throughout its run, the show was controversial for its off-color humor, black comedy, toilet humor, sexual innuendo, and violence, all of which contributed to the production staff’s altercations with Nickelodeon’s Standards and Practices department. The show developed a cult following during and after its run. It was pioneering for satirical animated shows like ‘Beavis and Butt-head’ and ‘South Park.’

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February 20, 2012

George Liquor

John K

George Liquor (often taking his epithet as George Liquor, American), most famous for his appearances on ‘The Ren and Stimpy Show,’ is a cartoon character created by John Kricfalusi and is a mascot for Kricfalusi’s defunct animation studio, Spümcø. Kricfalusi portrayed George Liquor as a patriotic, outspoken, politically conservative blowhard. Kricfalusi described Liquor as his favorite character to animate.

Kricfalusi described George Liquor as ‘the greatest American’ who is so conservative ‘that he thinks the Republicans are Commies.’ George harbors a deep antipathy for the political left; in one issue of Spümcø’s ‘Comic Book,’ George Liquor becomes enraged after a fish calls him a Democrat. George is a middle-aged, crass, religious, ultra-patriotic American who favors his nephew, Jimmy The Idiot Boy, and tries to teach Jimmy how to be ‘a Real Man.’

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February 20, 2012

John K

spumco

ren and stimpy

Michael John Kricfalusi [kris-fuh-loo-see] better known as John K., is a Canadian animator. He is creator of ‘The Ren & Stimpy Show,’ its adults-only spin-off ‘Ren & Stimpy ‘Adult Party Cartoon,” ‘The Ripping Friends’ animated series, and ‘Weekend Pussy Hunt,’ an interactive web-based cartoon, as well as the founder of animation studio Spümcø.

He spent his early childhood in Germany and Belgium, while his father served in the Canadian air force. At age seven he returned with his family to Canada. Having moved in the middle of a school season, he spent much of his time that year at home, watching Hanna-Barbera cartoons and drawing them. Kricfalusi’s interest in Golden Age animation crystallized during his stay at Sheridan College, where an acquaintance of his held weekly screenings of old films and cartoons, among them the cartoons of Bob Clampett and Tex Avery, which left a deep impression on him.

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