Mind’s Eye

minds eye

The phrase ‘mind’s eye‘ refers to the human ability for visualization, i.e., for the experiencing of visual mental imagery; in other words, one’s ability to ‘see’ things with the mind. The biological foundation of the mind’s eye is not fully understood. fMRI studies have shown that the lateral geniculate nucleus (in the thalamus) and the V1 area of the visual cortex are activated during mental imagery tasks.

Harvard Medical School psychiatrist John Ratey writes: ‘The visual pathway is not a one-way street. Higher areas of the brain can also send visual input back to neurons in lower areas of the visual cortex… As humans, we have the ability to see with the mind’s eye – to have a perceptual experience in the absence of visual input. For example, PET scans have shown that when subjects, seated in a room, imagine they are at their front door starting to walk either to the left or right, activation begins in the visual association cortex, the parietal cortex, and the prefrontal cortex – all higher cognitive processing centers of the brain.’

The rudiments of a biological basis for the mind’s eye is found in the deeper portions of the brain below the neocortex, or where the center of perception exists. The thalamus has been found to be discrete to other components in that it processes all forms of perceptional data relayed from both lower and higher components of the brain. Damage to this component can produce permanent perceptual damage, however when damage is inflicted upon the cerebral cortex, the brain adapts to neuroplasticity to amend any occlusions for perception.

It can be thought that the neocortex is a sophisticated memory storage warehouse in which data received as an input from sensory systems are compartmentalized via the cerebral cortex. This would essentially allow for shapes to be identified, although given the lack of filtering input produced internally, one may as a consequence, hallucinate – essentially seeing something that isn’t received as an input externally but rather internal (i.e. an error in the filtering of segmented sensory data from the cerebral cortex may result in one seeing, feeling, hearing or experiencing something that is inconsistent with reality).

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